Welcome to a rarely-seen, unintentionally hidden, look at the pillars of Peanuts.

Each segment of this exhibition offers a fresh look at the foundational themes of Peanuts. Charles M. Schulz acknowledged these themes in a 1988 interview; his initial list included ideas such as Lucy’s psychiatric booth and playing baseball. Schulz expanded on these ideas in later interviews and writings, giving readers a fascinating look at the strip from the creator’s point of view.

This collection of Peanuts strips is unique because they are not only original works of art, but until recently, had also never been exhibited. Many simply because there are so many rich examples of a given subject within the Museum’s collection of nearly 8,000 original Peanuts strips. Others because they have been too delicate to display but are now safely conserved. And some because they are new to the collection. No matter the reason, each strip gives readers a fresh look at the beloved themes that set Peanuts apart from others on the comic page.

Many of the strips in each section are from the same running series and provide a special look at sequential storylines that perhaps have not been seen together since leaving Schulz’s drawing board years ago. Other selections are only loosely connected by underlying themes. Look for original dates of publication of each strip as you scroll down to enjoy the exhibition.

“Curse you, Red Baron!”

Snoopy as the World War I Flying Ace climbs atop his doghouse to pilot his Sopwith Camel, in pursuit of the infamous Red Baron. Though never pictured in the strip, the Red Baron certainly has a presence. First mentioned in October 1965, the Red Baron was featured in dozens of strips. A professional respect snuck in during the later years, at least from the intrepid Flying Ace.

”I’m not sure how Snoopy got on top of the doghouse, but I’m glad he did, because it opened up whole new areas of fantasy for me.”  —Charles M. Schulz

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Charles M. Schulz
Peanuts
April 28, 1988
Ink on paper

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Charles M. Schulz
Peanuts
April 30, 1988
Ink on paper

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Charles M. Schulz
Peanuts
May 2, 1988
Ink on paper

Click the audio player to hear behind-the-scenes commentary from Alexis E. Fajardo (Editorial Director, Schulz Creative Associates); Jean Schulz (wife of Charles M. Schulz); and Benjamin L. Clark (Museum Curator).

Anatomy of a Comic Strip: The Peanuts strip below was designed to be published in the Sunday paper, which called for a larger format than the four-panel daily strips. Sunday strips were designed to include the top third of a strip as “throw-away panels.” Depending upon the amount of space each newspaper has for its Sunday comics, they might print only the bottom two-thirds of a strip. Thus, the top third must relate to the rest of the strip but is not integral to the story.

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Charles M. Schulz
Peanuts
May 17, 1992
Ink on paper

From the Archives: Charles Schulz heard from many fans of the Flying Ace, including real veterans of the skies of World War I, who were kind enough to write him and share stories of their experiences and hard-won knowledge to make details more accurate, something that was very important to Schulz.

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Letter from Arch Whitehouse
to Charles M. Schulz
June 20, 1967

Click the audio player to hear behind-the-scenes commentary from Alexis E. Fajardo (Editorial Director, Schulz Creative Associates); Benjamin L. Clark (Museum Curator); Justin Thompson (Senior Artist, Schulz Creative Associates); and Jean Schulz (wife of Charles M. Schulz).

Fun Fact!: The beloved storylines and characters of Peanuts have inspired innumerable objects, leaping from the pages of the newspapers into becoming licensed toys, art, keepsakes, and animation for the small and silver screens. In this exhibit, you will see a selection of the objects made for fans to enjoy, paired with the classic themes presented in comic strips.

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Limited Edition “Peanuts Magical Moments” Collection
Decorative Plate, 1988
Porcelain trimmed with 23kt gold

*End of Exhibition Sample*

This online exhibition contains sixteen more sections, like the sample above. For access to the full online exhibition, including more than 65 original Peanuts comic strips from the Schulz Museum’s collection, please click here.